Below are a list of the statistics used in the National Teen Driver Safety Week 2022 materials and their sources.

“Road crashes are the third-leading cause of death among young people ages 15 to 24 in Canada. Young people are killed in crashes at a higher rate than any other age group under 75 years old.”

Parachute. (2021). Potential Lost, Potential for Change: The Cost of Injury in Canada 2021. www.parachute.ca/costofinjury

Statistics Canada. (2020). Leading causes of death, total population, by age group [Table: 13-10-0394-01]. https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=1310039401

“Drivers who text while driving are up to six times more likely to be involved in a crash.” Owens, J.M., Dingus, T.A., Guo, F., Fang, Y., Perez, M. & McClafferty, J. (2018). Crash Risk of Cell Phone Use While Driving: A Case – Crossover Analysis of Naturalistic Driving Data. AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. https://aaafoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/CellPhoneCrashRisk_FINAL.pdf

“The risk of a crash increases when you take your eyes and attention off the road, even just for a second.” Transport Canada. (2019). Distracted driving. https://www.tc.gc.ca/en/services/road/stay-safe-when-driving/distracted-driving.html.

“There are several risk factors associated with cell phone use while driving. Watching parents and caregivers use their phone while driving is one of these factors.” Delgado, M. K., Wanner, K. J., & McDonald, C. (2016). Adolescent Cellphone Use While Driving: An Overview of the Literature and Promising Future Directions for Prevention. Media and Communication, 4(3), 79–89. https://doi.org/10.17645/mac.v4i3.536

“Speeding is a factor in one third of teen driver deaths in Canada.” TIRF. (2015). Trends Among Fatally Injured Teen Drivers, 2000-2012. https://tirf.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Trends-Among-Fatally-Injured-Teen-Drivers-2000-2012_11_V6.pdf.

“Teens are more likely to speed when other teens are with them in the vehicle.” Ferguson, S. A. (2013). Speeding-related fatal crashes among teen drivers and opportunities for reducing the risks. Governors Highway Safety Association. https://www.ghsa.org/sites/default/files/2016-11/GHSA Teen SpeedingFinal.pdf.

“There is no prize to be won for speeding – instead, the faster your speed, the more likely you are to be involved in a crash.” World Health Organization. (2008). Speed management: a road safety manual for decision-makers and practitioners. https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/speed-management-a-road-safety-manual-for-decision-makers-and-practitioners

“As your speed increases, your chances of avoiding a collision decrease.” World Health Organization. (2008). Speed management: a road safety manual for decision-makers and practitioners. https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/speed-management-a-road-safety-manual-for-decision-makers-and-practitioners

“With each increase of 1 km/h, the risk of pedestrian fatality and serious injury during a collision increase. At 50 km/h impact, the risk of a pedestrian dying is 29 per cent: almost six times what it is at 30 km/h.” Hussain, Q., Feng, H., Grzebieta, R., Brijs, T., & Olivier, J. (2019). The relationship between impact speed and the probability of pedestrian fatality during a vehicle-pedestrian crash: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 129, 241-249. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2019.05.033

“Nearly a quarter of deadly car crashes in Canada involve speeding.” TIRF. (2018). Sharing the road: key factors in fatal crashes in Canada. https://tirf.ca/TIRFCAD18EE   

“Cannabis impairs your ability to drive by affecting your balance and co-ordination, motor skills, attention, judgment, reaction time and decision-making skills.” Government of Canada. (2021, June 25). Don’t Drive High. https://www.canada.ca/en/campaign/don-t-drive-high.html.

“19% of youth said they have driven within four hours of using cannabis. Don’t risk your life or the lives of others: never drive high.” Parachute. (2019). Cannabis Attitudes Survey Report. Unpublished.

“35% of youth have been a passenger with a driver who used cannabis in the previous four hours.” Parachute. (2019). Cannabis Attitudes Survey Report. Unpublished.

“Motor vehicle crashes are the third-leading cause of death among 16- to 25-year-olds, and alcohol is a factor in almost half of those crashes.”Parachute. (2021). Potential Lost, Potential for Change: The Cost of Injury in Canada 2021. www.parachute.ca/costofinjury

Statistics Canada. (2020). Leading causes of death, total population, by age group [Table: 13-10-0394-01]. https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=1310039401

Brown, S. W., Vanlaar, W. G. M., & Robertson, R. D. (2017). Alcohol and Drug-Crash Problem in Canada 2015 Report. The Traffic Injury Research Foundation of Canada. https://ccmta.ca/web/default/files/PDF/2015_Alcohol_and_Drug_Crash_Problem_Report.FINAL_EN.pdf   

“One third of Canadians who say they’ve driven impaired do most of their drinking with close friends, partners or family members.” TIRF. (2018). Road Safety Monitor 2018: Drinking and Driving in Canada. http://tirf.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/RSM-Drinking-and-Driving-in-Canada-2018-11.pdf.

Top